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Poll!

Argh. I'm working with a horrid anthology this semester. I feel like everything included is stuff that my kids would have already read in high school. This obviously isn't everything I have to work with, but these are ones that I don't know whether to teach or not b/c they all seem like things I read in high school (not that they don't deserve multiple reads, but I know the kids who have already read them won't re-read them!)

Would ya'll do me a favor and arrange the following texts from MOST LIKELY to be taught in high school these days to LEAST LIKELY to be taught in high school these days? Don't mix up the categories. Thanks!

DRAMA
Chekov - The Cherry Orchard
Williams - A Streetcar Named Desire
MIller - Death of a Salesman
Sophocles- Antigone
Sophocles- Oedipus the King
Ibsen- A Doll's House
Shakespeare- Hamlet

FICTION
Poe- The Cask of Amontillado
Melville- Bartleby the Scrivener
Kafka- The Metamorphosis
Chopin- The Story of an Hour
Marquez- A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings
O'Brien- The Things they Carried

Comments

i'd suggest asking your students to go through the anthology and pick out things they've not read--sometimes i do this just to be sure we're all on some even footing. and, sometimes my students really enjoy going more in-depth, as you said, with the multiple readings--never trust they were taught well in high school ;-) my other advice is to use handouts outside the book--given that you may have to put things *in writing* for a syllabus.


from what the kids today say:
DRAMA
Sophocles- Oedipus the King/Shakespeare- Hamlet/MIller - Death of a Salesman (yes, a 3way tie)
Ibsen- A Doll's House
Sophocles- Antigone
Chekov - The Cherry Orchard
Williams - A Streetcar Named Desire

FICTION
O'Brien- The Things they Carried
Chopin- The Story of an Hour
Poe- The Cask of Amontillado
Marquez- A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings
Kafka- The Metamorphosis
Melville- Bartleby the Scrivener

ha--funny marquez is on the list--last year i thought i'd be really cool and teach this and lo: didn't i have a student who'd freakin lived DOWN THE STREET from marquez. who'd read it in spanish, the year orginally published. gar!

thanks--if anyone's teaching bartleby it's my shriveled up old ap teacher--i sometimes think i may be the last person to have read it. of course, i never really dug melville--sorry in advance to any melville fans. i'd take hawthorne over melville ANY day. come to think of it, i hardly even remember any of bartleby--i know it was dark and drear. what else is new with mel?
oh, yeah, now it's coming back to me-- really, i think i may reread ye olde scrivener.
oh, melville makes me *shudder* i was subjected to billy budd once. ugh. i skimmed moby. really, i did. just never cared for it--i think all the hype ruined it; hype tends to do that for me, that plus my teachers always claiming this is the single best book ever and i am just not ready to admit that's EVEN a possibility.

honestly, i admire folks who adore 18&19th c. american lit--really, i do. because i just don't. i'd like to. i've tried, believe me, i've tried. i'd just rather do algebra or get a splenectomy or something.

and, i'd like to read your journal, but lj thinks i'm 4 (literally) so i can't go to the erm, *adult* sites.
[pokes around stacks of books for ole mel]
kids still read?
DRAMA
Sophocles- Antigone
Shakespeare- Hamlet
Sophocles- Oedipus the King
MIller - Death of a Salesman
Ibsen- A Doll's House
Williams - A Streetcar Named Desire (but they may have seen the movie in H.S.)
Chekov - The Cherry Orchard




FICTION
Kafka- The Metamorphosis
Chopin- The Story of an Hour
Melville- Bartleby the Scrivener
Poe- The Cask of Amontillado
O'Brien- The Things they Carried
Marquez- A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings
So what I should learn from all of this is that there's no way of predicting what they have and haven't read and I should just assign whatever I want? :P
yes! And to hell if they've read it before! HS English is a lot about thematic groupthink, IMHO. If they read it again, you get to correct their teachers *and* teach them to think for themselves!
i love that: "correct their teachers" great line!
I once had a semester where I had to read the iliad 4 times for 4 different classes - 3 simultaneously at the same point in the semester, 2 different english translations, and 1 in greek.

and damned if I didn't re-read it all four times.

for one thing, I wanted to compare the different versions.
but also, each class was emphasizing different aspects and I wanted to do a fresh reading with my mind calibrated to look at those parts each time.

I probably wouldn't have thought to bring this up, except I'm taking this class at the UW now - a "get to know the classics department" course basically - and guess what I've been assigned to read this week.





1
Shakespeare
Miller
Ibsen
Oedipus
Anigone
Williams

2
Melville
Poe
Kafka
O'Brien
Marquez
Chopin
Drama:

Hamlet
Antigone
Oedipus
Death of Salesman
Doll's House
Cherry Orchard
Streetcar

(based on the fact that I read the first 3 in highschool and have never read the last three)

Fiction
O'Brian (I know this was on a lot of summer reading lists a few years ago)

I have no idea about the rest of the fiction category...I know I didn't read any of them in high school.